Healthy & Gluten Free

Author:     
Categories: Condiments - Sauces    

Dijon mustard is a very popular condiment. Making your own at home is a great way to add a delicious, all natural version to your meal planning. This recipe tastes great and is easy to make.

Dijon mustard in a small wooden bowl on a platter with sausage medallions
Image by: Shari's Berries

Prep time: 15 minutes      Cook time: 30 minutes      Makes: 3 cups      Difficulty: Medium

Gluten free Dairy free Egg free

There are a variety of different ways to prepare mustard. Try out some different variations and types, and find the ones that you like the best. If you prefer more of a bitter taste, then find a recipe that is boiled, such as this one. If you prefer a sweet mustard, then use a recipe that does not involve cooking or boiling. Try the Yellow Mustard, or the Whole Grain Dijon Mustard recipes for uncooked versions.

Use all organic ingredients.

Shopping Tips - what to look for to get the best gluten free, real ingredients for this recipe:

Fresh fruits and vegetables should be organic.

This reduces a number of toxic chemicals that can cause harm to humans. When you are required to eat gluten free, you will need to reduce all unnecessary stress on your stomach, so that it has a better chance of healing. Using organic fresh fruits and vegetables will go a long way to achieving this.

Each year a US report is created by the EWG (Environmental Working Group) listing the most and least pesticide contaminated common produce in the US. It is useful to know where to put your initial focus on what to buy organic and what can be lower on your priority list. I'd suggest that if a crop is not on the EWG "Clean 15" list on the below listed site, that you buy organic.

Consumer Reports has also published a report. They have a nice summary of residues on both conventional and organic produce. This is a good place to start if this is a new topic for you, and it gives good detail, but in a readable format.

They found that all organic produce has consistently been tested to show low or very low levels of residue. This can make you confident that organic is a good way to go. A link to their summary page on pesticide residues is linked below.

For anyone who really wants to dig into the full datasets of the EPA residue testing, they can find that at the bottom link below. This will include the most recent reported data.

Onions are on the EWG Clean 15 list of the least contaminated produce. They rank 5th on their list. However, they have not been tested since 2012. At the time less than 10 percent of conventional onion samples contained any pesticide residues. No conventional onion samples contained more than three pesticides. They should be purchased as organic.

Check out these 4 articles. The first 2 show this year's EWG report on pesticide contamination, and will be updated automatically based on the current year. The third article is the Consumer Reports summary page for pesticide residue on produce, including conventional and organic, and domestic and imported. The fourth article is the direct link to the EPA residue testing site, where you can do further research:

Fresh herbs and spices should be 100% certified organic.

This reduces a number of toxic chemicals that can cause harm to humans. When you are required to eat gluten free, you will need to reduce all unnecessary stress on your stomach, so that it has a better chance of healing. Using organic fresh fruits and vegetables will go a long way to achieving this.

Consumer Reports has also published a report. They have a nice summary of residues on both conventional and organic produce. This is a good place to start if this is a new topic for you, and it gives good detail, but in a readable format.

They found that all organic produce has consistently been tested to show low or very low levels of residue. This can make you confident that organic is a good way to go. A link to their summary page on pesticide residues is linked below.

Testing specifically on fresh and dried herbs and spices is more limited, and has not been done as consistently as other produce. Some of the testing that has been done, mostly on conventionally grown herbs and spices, is showing much higher pesticide residues than on other common fresh produce. For this reason, all fresh and dried spices and herbs should only be purchased as 100% certified organic.

A good option is also to grown you own herbs. Many herbs can be easily grown in small pots, even if just on your window sill in your kitchen. It is then possible to completely control what goes on them and into the soil.

Check out these 4 articles. The first is the Consumer Report on pesticide residues in general. The second article explains what the different versions of organic labeling mean. The third article is the USDA report on pesticide residues on organic produce. The fourth article is a pesticide report specifically on fresh and dried herbs and spices, in a limited market in the US:

You want to find raw, unfiltered honey. It has many nutritional benefits over pasteurized and filtered honey.

The best place to buy it is directly from the bee farmers, either at their farm or at a farmer’s market. Sometimes smaller health food stores may carry it. There's limited regulations on the word raw, so often store bought raw honey won't actually be raw. You can hunt for a farmer who is located next to organic land or wild land, and it will be the least contaminated.

Raw unfiltered honey will not be crystal clear. It should be crystal like, and have small or tiny "floaties." These floaties are bee pollen, honeycomb bits, propolis, and even broken bee wing fragments. Some farmers will have some light filtering, which will be simply a course sieve. This will remove the wings, but leave in the smaller bits of pollen and propolis.

Over time, raw honey will solidify. You don't want it filtered, or heated, or treated, which completely removes any benefits of honey.

For additional reading on raw and unfiltered honey, check out these 3 articles:

You want to buy 100% certified organic spices, with no additional additives, labeled gluten free, and labeled to state that no anti-caking agents or additives have been used.

100% organic certified products will contain no GM substances, and will not be irradiated. Without anti-caking agents, they can stick together. This is easily solved by stirring with a clean tool prior to using, if it has clumped together.

Note that when it says only Organic, it can contain small amounts of synthetic and GM substances (up to 5%). Many chemicals used in spices are not required to be labeled, thus you want 100% Certified Organic, and statements noting no additional additives used.

Spices should be used up within about 6 months. Any older and they can spoil, and will lose any benefits, and the flavor will fade.

To read more about spices and anti-caking agents, check out these 2 articles on our site:

Check out these other 2 articles on buying good spices and what the term Organic means:

Coconut oil - You want to look for organic coconut oil processed without chemicals. It does not need to be raw, since you're cooking with it, but you want it made without chemicals. You can also make your own coconut oil. Below there is a link to a You Tube video that shows you how to make both cold pressed, and heat created coconut oil.

Lard - You can also use unrefined, organic lard. You can make your own Homemade Lard here, on our site. If you are buying it, you do not want to buy the regular grocery store white blocks, as they are made with a number of toxic chemicals, some that don't need to be on the label, and are usually hydrogenated.

Palm oil - You also can use organic palm oil, as long as it's not processed with chemicals when it's made.

You want to avoid using vegetable oils when cooking, as they degrade into trans fats, which are extremely bad for you. Such as corn, canola, soy, grapeseed, sunflower, safflower, etc. Any oils with a significant amount of polyunsaturated fats should not be used for cooking.

Recent research is showing that saturated fats are not linked to heart health problems.

Saturated fats are the most heat stable to use for cooking. This is also why it's ok to cook with good quality oils that use heat during the processing, as long as they also don't use chemicals, and don't use hydrogenation.

This topic is very popular now, and you'll need to wade through a lot of conflicting information, and emerging information. Keep an eye out as more advances are made, and old ideas are discarded.

To learn more about these different types of oils, check out these 7 articles (I am NOT an affiliate of any of these):

You want to find unrefined salt, with no additives. It should say unrefined on the label. If it is refined, it will simply say salt. Refined salt does not need to list the chemicals used in the refining process, but the word "refined" will tell you that something was used (and most are toxic).

Look for unrefined sea salt, Himalayan salt, or various gourmet hand crafted salt.

Good sea salt should be unrefined, and will not be pure white.

There is also Himalayan salt that many consider a healthy source of salt. It is generally unrefined. There is some debate as to the quality, and the exact makeup of the other minerals found in it. If you find a source of it you like, then go ahead and use it. It's largest benefit is that it does not have added chemicals, and has a wide range of other minerals. If you want the other minerals, then this is a good option.

There are a number of different gourmet salts that are hand crafted via evaporation that are nice quality. With some investigating, you can find very clean, uncontaminated sources.

For additional reading on salt, check out this article on our site:

Tabasco brand sauce has about 1/2 of their product line that does not contain food additives. They are labeled gluten free, and most varieties are GMO free. It is, however, made with distilled vinegar. Legally, distilled vinegar is gluten free. However, in practice, many people still react to this kind of vinegar.

You can also look for other hot sauces. Be sure to read the label, and ensure it has no food additives, and some will be made with different types of vinegar, that are usually gluten free, such as apple cider vinegar. Look for those that are also labeled gluten free.

To learn more about vinegar, check out this article:

Look around for a gluten free, organic, additive free white wine.

Ask your local liquor store for your options, or do some online searching. Liquor makers are not required to fully disclose the ingredients used in their products. However, there are more and more companies recently that are open about what's in their products.

Note that there are some ingredients in liquors that will cause stomach upset and worsen many gut related issues, that are not directly related to the liquor. Because we think that many of the affects of a night of drinking are directly from the alcohol itself, we mistake some of the symptoms caused by some of the other ingredients.

If you want to have liquor, learn about and find the best quality, most natural, least adulterated and gluten free products you can find.

Check out these 2 articles on wine in particular, and liquor in general:

Ingredients:
1 cup Onions, chopped
2 cloves Garlic, minced
2 tablespoons Honey, raw and unfiltered
4 ounces Dry mustard
1 tablespoon Coconut oil
OR    
1 tablespoon Homemade Lard
2 teaspoons Sea salt
4 drops Tabasco sauce
2 cups Dry white wine
Directions:
  • Chop the onions into small pieces. Mince the garlic. In a small pot, combine the garlic, wine, and onion, and bring to a boil.
  • Turn the heat to low. Simmer for about 5 minutes, uncovered.
  • Remove from the heat and pour the mixture into a glass bowl. Set aside and let it cool.
  • Put the dry mustard into a clean small saucepan. Strain the wine / vegetable mixture into the pan, removing the onion and garlic. Mix well until it's a nice, smooth texture. Add the Tabasco sauce, sea salt, oil / lard, and honey. Mix thoroughly.
  • Reduce the heat to low and stir constantly until the mixture has thickened. Don't leave the mixture unattended. At this point, once it starts to thicken, constant stirring ensures a good consistency.
  • Once thickened, remove the mixture from the heat. Store in a glass jar. It should keep for up to 8 weeks.
  • It is recommended to put the mustard in the refrigerator for about 2 days before eating, to help blend all the flavors.
Tips:
After separating the garlic and onion, use it to flavor soup stock or simply add it while making your dinner.
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Gluten free quick start booklet on top of meal preparation
10 Steps to Healthy
Gluten Free Eating
 
The free 10 Step Guide is packed full of tips, tricks, recipes and regular member only tips to get you started on the road to healthy gluten free living.
Gluten free quick start booklet on top of meal preparation
10 Steps to Healthy
Gluten Free Eating
 
The free 10 Step Guide is packed full of tips, tricks, recipes and regular member only tips to get you started on the road to healthy gluten free living.
Gluten free quick start booklet on top of meal preparation
10 Steps to Healthy
Gluten Free Eating
 
The free 10 Step Guide is packed full of tips, tricks, recipes and regular member only tips to get you started on the road to healthy gluten free living.