FEAST FOR FREEDOM
Living and Thriving Gluten Free

Healthy & Gluten Free

Author:     
Categories: Main Dishes - Beef    

Rosemary sprigs and garlic cloves "scent" beef instead of overwhelming it with this marinade. Try this in place of some "shaker" beef spice mixes. It gives a hint of lovely flavor to beef.

Cut of marinated beef steak with rosemary and cubed potatoes on a cutting board
Image by: Thora Toft

Prep time: 15 minutes      Marinating time: 2 to 12 hours      Cook time: 1/2 hour to 1 hour      Makes: 4 servings      Difficulty: Medium

Gluten free Dairy free

Use organic, especially for the fresh herbs and garlic.

I don't normally recommend using olive oil for cooking, as it's not as heat stable as saturated fats (coconut or palm oil, lard, etc.), except that this marinade needs to be refrigerated, and the marinade needs to remain liquid. Olive oil is the next best thing to cooking with a saturated fat, and is the least damaged of the non-saturated fats. It is suitable for occasional cooking, such as this marinaded beef dish.

Shopping Tips - what to look for to get the best gluten free, whole food ingredients for this recipe:

Fresh fruits and vegetables should be organic.

Lemon juice should be made from fresh, organic lemons. Bottled lemon juice often has additives that can cause digestive issues, including preservatives and flavorings. Lemons have not been tested by the EPA for pesticide residue. Three other citrus fruits have been tested, and all of them are midway between the least and most residue contamination. Tangerines rank 22nd, grapefruit ranks 24th, and oranges rank 27th. Since organic produce for other fruits and vegetables have consistently had less residue, you should buy only organic lemons and limes.

This reduces a number of toxic chemicals that can cause harm to humans. When you are required to eat gluten free, you will need to reduce all unnecessary stress on your stomach, so that it has a better chance of healing. Using organic fresh fruits and vegetables will go a long way to achieving this.

Each year a US report is created by the EWG (Environmental Working Group) listing the most and least pesticide contaminated common produce in the US. It is useful to know where to put your initial focus on what to buy organic and what can be lower on your priority list. I'd suggest that if a crop is not on the EWG "Clean 15" list on the below listed site, that you buy organic.

Consumer Reports has also published a report. They have a nice summary of residues on both conventional and organic produce. This is a good place to start if this is a new topic for you, and it gives good detail, but in a readable format.

They found that all organic produce has consistently been tested to show low or very low levels of residue. This can make you confident that organic is a good way to go. A link to their summary page on pesticide residues is linked below.

For anyone who really wants to dig into the full datasets of the EPA residue testing, they can find that at the bottom link below. This will include the most recent reported data.

Check out these 4 articles. The first 2 show this year's EWG report on pesticide contamination, and will be updated automatically based on the current year. The third article is the Consumer Reports summary page for pesticide residue on produce, including conventional and organic, and domestic and imported. The fourth article is the direct link to the EPA residue testing site, where you can do further research:

You want to look for organic, extra virgin olive oil, with some sort of certification seal, such as NAOOA (The North American Olive Oil Association). It should be in a dark bottle, and will not be cheap. It should be used up within 2 years of harvest or bottling date. If it smells or tastes off, then try a different brand.

There has been some reported fraud cases of Extra Virgin Olive Oil over the last decade.

When you dig into the actual facts of the claims, there is a big conflict of interest. The sponsors of the studies were actually olive oil producers who were really trying to promote their own products over their competitors. These studies have also not been able to be repeated.

There are some gaps in the current testing methods. There is no true way at the moment to test for 100% accuracy of high quality extra virgin olive oil.

However, there is some certification that will give you a higher chance of getting good quality oil, such as the NAOOA seal on the bottle.

For additional reading on olive oil, check out these 5 articles:

You want to find unrefined salt, with no additives. It should say unrefined on the label. If it is refined, it will simply say salt. Refined salt does not need to list the chemicals used in the refining process, but the word "refined" will tell you that something was used (and most are toxic).

Look for unrefined sea salt, Himalayan salt, or various gourmet hand crafted salt.

Good sea salt should be unrefined, and will not be pure white.

There is also Himalayan salt that many consider a healthy source of salt. It is generally unrefined. There is some debate as to the quality, and the exact makeup of the other minerals found in it. If you find a source of it you like, then go ahead and use it. It's largest benefit is that it does not have added chemicals, and has a wide range of other minerals. If you want the other minerals, then this is a good option.

There are a number of different gourmet salts that are hand crafted via evaporation that are nice quality. With some investigating, you can find very clean, uncontaminated sources.

For additional reading on salt, check out this article on our site:

You want to buy 100% certified organic spices, with no additional additives, labeled gluten free, and labeled to state that no anti-caking agents or additives have been used.

100% organic certified products will contain no GM substances, and will not be irradiated. Without anti-caking agents, they can stick together. This is easily solved by stirring with a clean tool prior to using, if it has clumped together.

Note that when it says only Organic, it can contain small amounts of synthetic and GM substances (up to 5%). Many chemicals used in spices are not required to be labeled, thus you want 100% Certified Organic, and statements noting no additional additives used.

Spices should be used up within about 6 months. Any older and they can spoil, and will lose any benefits, and the flavor will fade.

To read more about spices and anti-caking agents, check out these 2 articles on our site:

Check out these other 2 articles on buying good spices and what the term Organic means:

Fresh herbs and spices should be 100% certified organic.

This reduces a number of toxic chemicals that can cause harm to humans. When you are required to eat gluten free, you will need to reduce all unnecessary stress on your stomach, so that it has a better chance of healing. Using organic fresh fruits and vegetables will go a long way to achieving this.

Consumer Reports has also published a report. They have a nice summary of residues on both conventional and organic produce. This is a good place to start if this is a new topic for you, and it gives good detail, but in a readable format.

They found that all organic produce has consistently been tested to show low or very low levels of residue. This can make you confident that organic is a good way to go. A link to their summary page on pesticide residues is linked below.

Testing specifically on fresh and dried herbs and spices is more limited, and has not been done as consistently as other produce. Some of the testing that has been done, mostly on conventionally grown herbs and spices, is showing much higher pesticide residues than on other common fresh produce. For this reason, all fresh and dried spices and herbs should only be purchased as 100% certified organic.

A good option is also to grown you own herbs. Many herbs can be easily grown in small pots, even if just on your window sill in your kitchen. It is then possible to completely control what goes on them and into the soil.

Check out these 4 articles. The first is the Consumer Report on pesticide residues in general. The second article explains what the different versions of organic labeling mean. The third article is the USDA report on pesticide residues on organic produce. The fourth article is a pesticide report specifically on fresh and dried herbs and spices, in a limited market in the US:

You want to find organic beef, that is grass fed, and grass finished.

This may be somewhat difficult to find, though there are starting to be more and more places where you can get this.

If you can't find exactly this, then do your best to get the best you can. The priority should loosely be grass fed, no antibiotics and no growth hormones, non GM fed, grass finished, and organic.

The health benefits of this kind of meat is well documented, and well worth the extra cost.

Check out this article that will explain the benefits and help you understand why this is the preferred type of beef to purchase:

Ingredients:
1/3 cup Fresh lemon juice
1 cup Extra virgin olive oil
1 tablespoon Sea salt
2 teaspoons Freshly ground black pepper
8 large sprigs Fresh rosemary
2 to 8 cloves Garlic, crushed and peeled
1 very small Hot pepper, fresh, chopped (optional)
4 servings Beef, your choice of cut
Special Note:
You can adjust the quantity of lemon juice and oil if you need to. Keep the ratio 1 part lemon juice to 3 parts oil.
Directions:
  • The rosemary can be used whole, right on the stem, or pick the leaves off and chop them up finely. Juice fresh lemons to make needed amount.
  • Combine all ingredients except beef in a shallow bowl or sturdy plastic bag.
  • Add beef to shallow bowl or bag. Ensure that the meat is fully covered by the mixture.
  • Let marinade between 2 to 12 hours in the refrigerator.
  • Prepare frying pan, grill or baking dish. Cook beef as desired. You can use a bit of the marinade to glaze the meat during cooking, especially the spice bits.
  • Discard marinade.
  • Serve with roasted or pan fried potatoes, steamed veggies and a crisp mixed salad.

Enjoy!

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Gluten free quick start booklet on top of meal preparation
10 Steps to Healthy
Gluten Free Eating
 
The free 10 Step Guide is packed full of tips, tricks, recipes and regular member only tips to get you started on the road to healthy gluten free living.
Gluten free quick start booklet on top of meal preparation
10 Steps to Healthy
Gluten Free Eating
 
The free 10 Step Guide is packed full of tips, tricks, recipes and regular member only tips to get you started on the road to healthy gluten free living.
Gluten free quick start booklet on top of meal preparation
10 Steps to Healthy
Gluten Free Eating
 
The free 10 Step Guide is packed full of tips, tricks, recipes and regular member only tips to get you started on the road to healthy gluten free living.