Healthy & Gluten Free

Author:           Updated July 14, 2018
Categories: Snacks - Chips    

These are easier to make than you'd think, and makes a much better version than you'd find in the store.

Lightly browned homemade potato chips on a plate
Image by: Thora Toft

Prep time: 15 minutes      Cook time: 25 minutes      Makes: 8 servings      Difficulty: Medium

When using a Real oil, these become a healthy part of a diet. You can season them simply with some sea salt, or kick it up with some fresh, organic herbs. You could make some homemade chip dip with Homemade Mayo as a healthy base.

Gluten free Dairy free Egg free Vegan
Shopping Tips - what to look for to get the best gluten free, real ingredients for this recipe:

Fresh fruits and vegetables should be organic.

This reduces a number of toxic chemicals that can cause harm to humans. When you are required to eat gluten free, you will need to reduce all unnecessary stress on your stomach, so that it has a better chance of healing. Using organic fresh fruits and vegetables will go a long way to achieving this.

Each year a US report is created by the EWG (Environmental Working Group) listing the most and least pesticide contaminated common produce in the US. It is useful to know where to put your initial focus on what to buy organic and what can be lower on your priority list. I'd suggest that if a crop is not on the EWG "Clean 15" list on the below listed site, that you buy organic.

Consumer Reports has also published a report. They have a nice summary of residues on both conventional and organic produce. This is a good place to start if this is a new topic for you, and it gives good detail, but in a readable format.

They found that all organic produce has consistently been tested to show low or very low levels of residue. This can make you confident that organic is a good way to go. A link to their summary page on pesticide residues is linked below.

For anyone who really wants to dig into the full datasets of the EPA residue testing, they can find that at the bottom link below. This will include the most recent reported data.

Potatoes are listed as #11 on the EWG "Dirty Dozen" list (2018). Conventional potatoes had more pesticide residues by weight than any other crop. One pesticide in particular, chlorpropham, makes up the bulk of pesticides detected on potatoes. They should be purchased as organic.

Yams have not been tested by the EPA for pesticide residue. Sweet potatoes have been tested, and they are midway between the least and most residue contamination. Sweet potatoes rank 31st. Since organic produce for other fruits and vegetables have consistently had less residue, you should buy only organic yams and sweet potatoes.

Plantains have not been tested by the EPA for pesticide residue. Since organic produce for other fruits and vegetables have consistently had less residue, you should buy only organic plantains.

Check out these 4 articles. The first 2 show this year's EWG report on pesticide contamination, and will be updated automatically based on the current year. The third article is the Consumer Reports summary page for pesticide residue on produce, including conventional and organic, and domestic and imported. The fourth article is the direct link to the EPA residue testing site, where you can do further research:

Coconut oil - You want to look for organic coconut oil processed without chemicals. It does not need to be raw, since you're cooking with it, but you want it made without chemicals. You can also make your own coconut oil. Below there is a link to a You Tube video that shows you how to make both cold pressed, and heat created coconut oil.

Lard - You can also use unrefined, organic lard. You can make your own Homemade Lard here, on our site. If you are buying it, you do not want to buy the regular grocery store white blocks, as they are made with a number of toxic chemicals, some that don't need to be on the label, and are usually hydrogenated.

Palm oil - You also can use organic palm oil, as long as it's not processed with chemicals when it's made.

You want to avoid using vegetable oils when cooking, as they degrade into trans fats, which are extremely bad for you. Such as corn, canola, soy, grapeseed, sunflower, safflower, etc. Any oils with a significant amount of polyunsaturated fats should not be used for cooking.

Recent research is showing that saturated fats are not linked to heart health problems.

Saturated fats are the most heat stable to use for cooking. This is also why it's ok to cook with good quality oils that use heat during the processing, as long as they also don't use chemicals, and don't use hydrogenation.

This topic is very popular now, and you'll need to wade through a lot of conflicting information, and emerging information. Keep an eye out as more advances are made, and old ideas are discarded.

To learn more about these different types of oils, check out these 7 articles (I am NOT an affiliate of any of these):

You want to find unrefined salt, with no additives. It should say unrefined on the label. If it is refined, it will simply say salt. Refined salt does not need to list the chemicals used in the refining process, but the word "refined" will tell you that something was used (and most are toxic).

Look for unrefined sea salt, Himalayan salt, or various gourmet hand crafted salt.

Good sea salt should be unrefined, and will not be pure white.

There is also Himalayan salt that many consider a healthy source of salt. It is generally unrefined. There is some debate as to the quality, and the exact makeup of the other minerals found in it. If you find a source of it you like, then go ahead and use it. It's largest benefit is that it does not have added chemicals, and has a wide range of other minerals. If you want the other minerals, then this is a good option.

There are a number of different gourmet salts that are hand crafted via evaporation that are nice quality. With some investigating, you can find very clean, uncontaminated sources.

For additional reading on salt, check out this article on our site:

You want to buy 100% certified organic spices, with no additional additives, labeled gluten free, and labeled to state that no anti-caking agents or additives have been used.

100% organic certified products will contain no GM substances, and will not be irradiated. Without anti-caking agents, they can stick together. This is easily solved by stirring with a clean tool prior to using, if it has clumped together.

Note that when it says only Organic, it can contain small amounts of synthetic and GM substances (up to 5%). Many chemicals used in spices are not required to be labeled, thus you want 100% Certified Organic, and statements noting no additional additives used.

Spices should be used up within about 6 months. Any older and they can spoil, and will lose any benefits, and the flavor will fade.

To read more about spices and anti-caking agents, check out these 2 articles on our site:

Check out these other 2 articles on buying good spices and what the term Organic means:

Fresh herbs and spices should be 100% certified organic.

This reduces a number of toxic chemicals that can cause harm to humans. When you are required to eat gluten free, you will need to reduce all unnecessary stress on your stomach, so that it has a better chance of healing. Using organic fresh fruits and vegetables will go a long way to achieving this.

Consumer Reports has also published a report. They have a nice summary of residues on both conventional and organic produce. This is a good place to start if this is a new topic for you, and it gives good detail, but in a readable format.

They found that all organic produce has consistently been tested to show low or very low levels of residue. This can make you confident that organic is a good way to go. A link to their summary page on pesticide residues is linked below.

Testing specifically on fresh and dried herbs and spices is more limited, and has not been done as consistently as other produce. Some of the testing that has been done, mostly on conventionally grown herbs and spices, is showing much higher pesticide residues than on other common fresh produce. For this reason, all fresh and dried spices and herbs should only be purchased as 100% certified organic.

A good option is also to grown you own herbs. Many herbs can be easily grown in small pots, even if just on your window sill in your kitchen. It is then possible to completely control what goes on them and into the soil.

Check out these 4 articles. The first is the Consumer Report on pesticide residues in general. The second article explains what the different versions of organic labeling mean. The third article is the USDA report on pesticide residues on organic produce. The fourth article is a pesticide report specifically on fresh and dried herbs and spices, in a limited market in the US:

You can make Homemade Mayonnaise here, on our site, that is gluten free.

If you absolutely don't want to make your own mayonnaise, then you'll need to find mayonnaise made with organic ingredients if possible, and no bad oils, and labeled gluten free. They should not contain canola, soy, sunflower, safflower, or corn oil. It could contain extra virgin olive oil, coconut oil, or avocado oil.

Many have vinegar, and it will need to list the type of vinegar, so you can determine if it's a gluten free variety (most apple cider and cane sugar vinegar are gluten free, for example).

There are starting to be some Paleo friendly bottled mayonnaise on the market. They are more expensive, but you will have a better chance of finding one containing the right kinds of ingredients. Shop around to find the highest quality, with no additives.

Check out the following article to learn a bit more about mayonnaise:

Ingredients:
4 large Russet potatoes, organic
1/2 cup Coconut oil, or more depending on your pan
  Sea salt
Notes:
You can try out some other kinds of potatoes or vegetables with this method, such as using Yams, or green plantains. When making a batch of chips, cut up a small amount of some other vegetable, to see how it turns out. This allows you to try something a bit different without committing to a large batch of something completely new.
Directions:
  • Wash potatoes. Peel, if desired.
  • Slice potatoes into thin, even slices. These taste great thin or thick, as long as you just pick one or the other. If they're not evenly sliced they don't cook evenly and you end up with some raw ones, and some burnt ones. You can slice them manually, or use a Mandolin slicer, or the slicing attachment on a food processor.
  • Rinse sliced potatoes in cold water.
  • Soak the sliced potatoes in cold water for 30 minutes or more, up to about 8 hours. If you're short on time, you can skip soaking them, but the chips may not be as crispy.
  • Drain the potatoes. Lay them on a kitchen towel or paper towels to dry. You can pat them with a towel to help them dry faster.
  • In a deep skillet, pot, or deep fryer, melt the coconut oil over medium high heat. You'll need about 1/2 an inch of oil in the pan or skillet, so you may need more or less oil depending on the size of your pot.
  • Heat the coconut oil to about 350 to­ 375 degrees. This is about the smoke point limit of good quality coconut oil. A candy or frying thermometer can give you an exact temperature, though you can test it with a potato slice; it will sizzle when you drop one in if the oil is ready.
  • Fry the potatoes in small batches, just enough to make a single layer of potato slices in the pan. Cook for about 1­2 minutes per side, or until golden brown.
  • Use a slotted spoon or tongs to remove the chips from the oil. Drain on paper towels, or a wire cooling rack placed over a drip dish.
  • Repeat until all the potato slices are done.
  • Sprinkle with sea salt, black pepper or any other fresh or dried organic herbs or spices.

Allow the homemade potato chips to cool before eating, if you can!

FREE Guide to get you started
10 Steps to Healthy Gluten Free Eating
The free 10 Step Guide is packed full of tips, tricks, recipes and regular Member only tips to get you started on the road to healthy gluten free living.
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Gluten free quick start booklet on top of meal preparation
10 Steps to Healthy
Gluten Free Eating
 
The free 10 Step Guide is packed full of tips, tricks, recipes and regular member only tips to get you started on the road to healthy gluten free living.
Gluten free quick start booklet on top of meal preparation
10 Steps to Healthy
Gluten Free Eating
 
The free 10 Step Guide is packed full of tips, tricks, recipes and regular member only tips to get you started on the road to healthy gluten free living.
Gluten free quick start booklet on top of meal preparation
10 Steps to Healthy
Gluten Free Eating
 
The free 10 Step Guide is packed full of tips, tricks, recipes and regular member only tips to get you started on the road to healthy gluten free living.